Test, Track, Treat

Paramedic Nina Leimer passes a COVID-19 testing tent in Berlin, Germany, March 30, 2020. Image: Kay Nietfeld/Picture Alliance/Getty
Image credit
Paramedic Nina Leimer passes a COVID-19 testing tent in Berlin, Germany, March 30, 2020. Image: Kay Nietfeld/Picture Alliance/Getty

Countries that adopted a test, track and treat approach gained an early edge against COVID-19.

Germany jumped to develop a test by January—which, combined with its ample intensive care beds and early embrace of social distancing—could explain why it's seeing fewer deaths than its neighbors, according to the AP. Germany reports 775 deaths and 71,000 cases; compare that to Italy’s 12,400 deaths for 106,000 cases and Spain’s 9,000+ deaths­­­­­­­­­­­­­ and 102,000 cases.

If most of your most coronavirus tests are coming back positive, the WHO warns, you’re probably missing a lot of cases. A good benchmark of adequate testing, says Michael Ryan, executive director of the WHO Health Emergencies Program, is 10 negative tests to 1 positive, NPR reports.

Next, Germany has its sights set on testing people who have recovered for antibodies to the virus—and issuing certificates that will allow recipients to return to work, The Telegraph reports.

And Chinese scientists report promising research on the antibodies front; Reuters reports that they’ve isolated several antibodies from survivors that appear to be “extremely effective” at blocking the new coronavirus from breaking into cells—which could lead to new treatments.

Comments +

0 comments

Post a Comment

Restricted HTML

  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Back to top