The Latest on Vaccines: A Matter of the Heart

Young people walk by a sign that reads, "Now available! COVID-19 vaccine" in TriBeCa, New York City. May 27, 2021. Image: Noam Galai/Getty
Image credit
Young people walk by a sign that reads, "Now available! COVID-19 vaccine" in TriBeCa, New York City. May 27, 2021. Image: Noam Galai/Getty

The results are in: US scientists found a “likely association” between COVID-19 vaccines and heightened risk of rare heart issues in adolescents and young adults, according to new data presented to the CDC Wednesday, STAT reports.
 
The findings align with existing research showing that young people—particularly men under 30—have higher rates of myocarditis and pericarditis after receiving both doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.
 
Cases are rare and while most were hospitalized, the majority have been discharged.
 
The CDC’s takeaway: The vaccines’ benefits still far outweigh the risks.
  

Boosters? Not Just Yet


CDC scientists say there still isn’t enough data to recommend them to the general population—but didn’t rule it out in the future if vaccine immunity wanes or variants are found to evade current formulas, CNBC reports.  
 
Possible exception: Vulnerable groups, like elderly people and transplant recipients, may need an extra dose.
  

Filling the Pregnancy Data Void


Where do countries stand on recommending COVID vaccines during pregnancy? According to the COMIT tracker launched today, they vary widely.
 
Better data could change that.
 
The NIH has announced a new study seeking more solid data on how well COVID-19 vaccines work in people who are pregnant and postpartum, following participants and their infants through the first year after delivery.
 
Pregnancy is a known risk factor for severe COVID-19—but so far clinical data is lacking on vaccination in these groups.
 
The MOMI-VAX study will also investigate vaccine safety and the transfer of vaccine-induced antibodies via the placenta and breast milk.

Secondary Topic
Comments +

0 comments

Post a Comment

Restricted HTML

  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Back to top