Deploying new vaccines has always been a messy business of logistical hurdles, ethical questions, and amazing feats.   Take the first-ever vaccine campaign, Spain’s 19th century effort to stamp out smallpox in its far flung colonies.

We’ll be observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, January 18 in the US so GHN will not be publishing. We’ll be back Tuesday with more news. 

A Chinese-made coronavirus vaccine has an efficacy rate just over 50%—far lower than the 78% anticipated, according to a Brazilian clinical trial conducted by São Paulo’s Butantan Institute.  

In 2014, Detroit began turning off the taps of residents who couldn’t pay their water bills—most of them poor and Black.   The pandemic has triggered a moratorium until 2022 on depriving water to those who can’t pay—but a permanent solution is still out of reach.

The issue is far from settled among economists and politicians, as NPR repor

One Friday last month, I posted a map on Twitter. It drew immediate global attention, was seen by 8 million people, and has provoked strong responses and anger—and hopefully some soul-searching among those in governments and pharmaceutical companies.

For many detainees in US immigration facilities, the coronavirus was impossible to avoid. They were sleeping 3 feet apart with 36 people in a room.

“The virus took Grandma Delores first, silencing an 86-year-old voice that rang with Lakota songs and stories.”  

The data show that communities of color have been hit the hardest in the pandemic—yet many still do not see systemic racism as a barrier to good health.