Full-scale efforts are underway to develop a vaccine free us from COVID-19’s deadly grip. But even if they succeed (and that’s no guarantee), the question regrettably must be asked: Will people take it?

A coronavirus outbreak that emerged in Wuhan, China in December 2019 has snowballed into the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the virus that causes the disease has infected nearly 2.6 million people around the world–killing more than 178,800 people as of April 22, 2020.  This FAQ…

As high school students in St. Louis, Missouri, we reaped the benefits of global health security every time we sat in classrooms with our friends. Now that sense of safety has evaporated, and students everywhere are living the consequences of inadequate health policies.…

COVID-19’s lethal invasion in late 2019 has turned the world inside out. Yet, another disease, tuberculosis, has been plaguing humans since the Upper Paleolithic era, some 20,000 years ago. In fact, many infection-prevention precautions promoted for the coronavirus—coughing…

The WHO has called out China for failing to share data on coronavirus infections among health care workers—one of the global health agency’s few public criticisms of China’s handling of the outbreak, according to The Washington Post. China waited until February 14 to…

COVID-19’s spread on cruise ships is raising tough questions about how to track the disease and what’s the best approach to quarantines.  

While the global health community has mobilized swiftly against the Wuhan coronavirus,  preventable childhood pneumonia kills more than 800,000 children each year—making it more lethal than HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. 

It’s the global health world’s ultimate goal: disease elimination. After the eradication of smallpox in 1979, the global health community set its sights on several other deadly diseases, including polio, TB, and malaria. Comprehensively beating diseases like these is a…

“History will judge us by the difference we make in the everyday lives of children,” said Nelson Mandela at the 2002 UN General Assembly Special Session on Children. 1.3 billion children around the world lack access to surgical and anesthesia care.