Striking numbers of COVID-19 patients on ventilators are not surviving.   A recent UK study found only 33 of 98 patients on ventilators were survivors, while a small study in China documented only 3 of 22 ventilated patients lived. Ventilators are seen as crucial largely…

Mass distribution of the antibiotic azithromycin has been shown to reduce under-5 mortality by 14% compared to the placebo.   But those promising results also raised big questions about the usefulness of mass deploying antibiotics, and whether it promotes antibiotic…

A $2 on-the-spot diagnostic test could reinvigorate efforts to fight yaws—a “forgotten disease.”   Affecting thousands of the world’s poorest children, the bacterial skin disease causes lesions and ulcers all over the body. Left untreated, its victims become disabled and…

The WHO announced a new campaign yesterday that doubles down on the “invisible pandemic” of antimicrobial resistance, urging countries to adopt its new digital tool to expedite the process.

Modern medicine is facing the convergence of 2 major problems: the rise of antibiotic resistance and the fall of efforts to find badly needed replacements, write Allan Coukell and Helen W. Boucher. In 2018 alone, 3 Big Pharma firms halted antibiotics R&D; others have…

Before antibiotics became widespread in the 1950s, the go-to treatment for tuberculosis was a healthy dose of isolation, fresh air and sunshine.   This protocol gave way to purpose-built sanatoria designed to minimize the spread of germs. Their design hallmarks, like flat…

Antibiotics alone may be enough to cure appendicitis, upending a century-old standard of “slicing tiny, inflamed organs from people’s guts” to cure the condition, according to research published this week in JAMA.  

Manufacturing antibiotics is tricky: They’re as pricey to make as any other drug but, unlike meds for cancer or chronic illnesses, they’re curative. That means limited doses are required for success. Their profitability is also curbed by antibiotic resistance that forces…

The WHO says it will decide by 2019 whether to recommend routine antibiotics for infants in poor countries after a large study—known as the Mordor trial—revealed that receiving 2 annual doses of antibiotics reduced infant mortality by as much as 25%.

The WHO is urging the agriculture industry against overusing antibiotics on livestock, hoping to curb resistance to medically important drugs for humans.    The new guidelines warn farmers against preemptively administering antibiotics to livestock.