Millions in Bangladesh are slowly poisoning themselves from drinking arsenic-contaminated water, and the government’s response is failing to help the people most in need of alternatives. While arsenic occurs naturally in the soil, rural, poor areas that depend on shallow…

Concerned over levels of inorganic arsenic in baby rice cereals, the US FDA proposed a new limit of 100 parts per billion. Out of 76 cereals tested, about 1/2 exceeded the proposed limit. Given consumption relative to body weight, infants are particularly vulnerable.…

A new Environmental Health study involving 450 children in Bangladesh finds that low or moderate exposure to arsenic in drinking water can make children more vulnerable to pneumonia. While the mechanism is not yet fully understood, arsenic in the drinking water seems to…

Cooking rice in an ordinary coffee percolator that repeatedly flushes it through with fresh hot water has been shown to remove much of the grain’s stored arsenic, researchers report in PLoS ONE.  Arsenic is "mobile" in liquid water, and thus can be removed by cooking the…

There’s no cure to counter chronic arsenic poisoning, but new research suggests that some people have adapted genetically to quickly flush it out of their system. In a small Andean town in Argentina, some people have picked up a cluster of mutations in the gene, called…