Cancer death disparities between African Americans and whites narrowed significantly in the last 30 years. In 1990, the “excess risk” in cancer mortality for black people was 47%. A recent American Cancer Society study found that number dropped to 19% by 2016.   The dive is…

The US cancer death rate has declined for 25 years—dropping 27% between 1991 and 2016—thanks to early detection and more people passing on smoking, an American Cancer Society report released yesterday shows.  

Despite decades of investigation, no one really knows why hotspots of certain cancers exist. For example, a worldwide average of 5.9 people per 100,000 develop esophageal cancer each year, but in Malawi that number is 24 in 100,000.   To solve these mysteries, the…

Manufacturing antibiotics is tricky: They’re as pricey to make as any other drug but, unlike meds for cancer or chronic illnesses, they’re curative. That means limited doses are required for success. Their profitability is also curbed by antibiotic resistance that forces…

“In a lot of Indigenous languages, there’s no word for cancer,” says Aboriginal patient navigator Leonard Benoit—a nurse-cum-advocate for First Nations patients with the Toronto Central Regional Cancer Program. In this role, he helps translate and clarify diagnosis and…

Nearly 10 million people will die of cancer—the world’s fastest growing killer—this year, according to new incidence and mortality estimates released by the UN International Agency for Research on Cancer.   Insights include:

The verdict is in: the only no-risk level of alcohol consumption is… zero, according to researchers behind the latest Global Burden of Diseases study.

Some species sidestep cancer almost entirely while others are highly prone to it, a disparity that has scientists looking to learn from certain animals’ built-in defense mechanisms—or lack thereof—to better address cancer in humans. Take elephants: One might assume their…

South Indian women diagnosed with cancer fear more than death—they worry about their reputation.   Shame, amplified for cancers involving the reproductive system, can stop them from getting tested and treated, discovered medical anthropologist and Wilson Center Public…

A new "cut and paste" method rewriting genome sequences in T cells is poised to be a game-changer in the field of cell therapy, accelerating new treatments for diseases like cancer and rare inherited disorders.