The new World Meteorological Organization’s State of the Climate report warns that we’re running out of time: 

“Antimicrobial resistance is a more immediate threat to human health than climate change,” writes epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee, and it’s worsening with overuse of antibiotics and a lack of alternatives.   Phage therapy—using bacteriophages, or viruses that only attack…

Severe droughts could drive new HIV infections in Africa, research in Lesotho illustrates.   Teen girls in climate-shocked areas were more likely to drop out of school, become sexually active earlier and contract HIV, according to research ed by Andrea Low, an assistant…

The idyllic Micronesian island of Kiribati, next door to French Polynesia (Tahiti) and boasting one of the largest marine sanctuaries in the world, is a tropical paradise. It’s hard to believe that its people are expected to become some of the world’s first climate change…

The global scourges of obesity, climate change and malnutrition are intertwined. Tackling them all at once means taking on their shared menace: A global food industry that fights any public health effort that threatens profits, according to a Lancet report.

Despite the now-boundless reach of his famous TV programs, more people than ever are out of touch with the natural world, the iconic naturalist David Attenborough warned at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland, BBC reported.

A few days into 2019, ClimateAdam is in the early stages of Veganuary

2018 wasn’t a quiet year in global health. Between human rights atrocities, reemerging diseases, and climate change, we’ve pulled together our list of problems that couldn’t be conquered in 2018, setting a busy agenda for 2019.  

At the Center for Global Development Leaders’ Conference in London last week, agency leaders faced some harsh truths about multilateral global aid. Namely: Global issues like climate change and population growth are increasingly systemic and borderless while the political…

Wildfires, even those stoked by climate change, are natural phenomena. “What turns them into disaster,” says Ian Davies of the University of Washington, “are the social and political factors.”