Could gun-carrying bans stem the scourge of gun violence in Latin America?   In 2012 Colombia tried it out, enacting permanent gun-carrying bans in Bogotá and Medellín. Gun-related mortality fell by a fifth in both cities—twice as much as cities with no bans in place, found…

Gun deaths make headlines, but survivors—even those with minor injuries—are often left with long-lasting physical and mental trauma, according to a new study. The study is part of a new guard of firearm research that has emerged after a “decades-long drought” of support,…

Students in Santa Fe, Texas and Parkland, Florida are struggling at school in the aftermath of devastating mass shootings last year. While the media frenzy has tapered off, applications for federal Project SERV grants—designed to help schools recover from violence—detail…

On September 23, join the American Public Health Association and the Bloomberg American Health Initiative for Policies That Work to Reduce Gun Violence, livestreamed from Washington DC.

Hawaii’s gun death rate is only 2.5—far below the US’s 10.6 average. And it’s not because there aren’t guns there. Hawaii has robust hunting and gun collection cultures, but few guns are used in violent crime. This could be due to state laws correlated with lower gun death…

The CDC is rejigging its public data portal in response to reporting that revealed just how unreliable its estimates for nonfatal gunshot injuries are.   What makes the data so unreliable? A statistical model vulnerable to sudden sample shifts.   Without a dedicated…

After mass shootings, like those in Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas, medical workers “set aside their emotions” and spring into action, writes Gina Kolata in a New York Times article.   Yet even when they succeed, survivors often face a future of suffering.  

America’s gun violence problem calls for a public health approach, leaders from the country’s largest physician professional societies said in a joint statement yesterday.   7 groups including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association teamed up…

The deaths of 29 people in 2 mass shootings in the US over the weekend shocked Americans numbed by gun violence—and forced them to recognize again the threat posed by white supremacists in a nation with 270 million firearms.