Tech tools can boost disease-prevention outreach—but reaching remote areas without Internet, cell phone coverage, or ready access to local TV and print media demands a creative approach.

In information wars, the conflict isn’t always between “real” and “fake” news, but between facts and values, writes David Scales in “French Lessons,” his aptly-titled piece about chronic Lyme disease for Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting.  

Evidence-based medicine advocates have spent years developing tools and techniques to fight back against false information around health and health care. VOX writer Julia Belluz recently explored the lessons these advocates have learned and how their experience can bolster…

Feeling behind on your scientific journal reading? Not sure where to submit your latest paper? Physician and global health practitioner David Flood has curated an eclectic and lengthy list of worthwhile journals, with an emphasis on noncommunicable diseases, open access,…

ATLANTA—Can climate change deniers and skeptics be converted? For beleaguered believers bent on trying, a communications panel at the Climate & Health Meeting here last Friday offered some concrete advice. First of all, panelists emphasized that solutions are out there…

Even countries that like to control the flow of information can’t always keep the lid on social media.   In Vietnam, when a deadly measles outbreak struck in 2014, people turned to social media for information, suspecting the health ministry of playing down the outbreak. At…

At the height of Sierra Leone’s Ebola outbreak, fears and misperceptions surrounding the country’s public health system likely translated into delays in seeking care, according to researcher Thespina Yamanis and colleagues at American University.   Most people interviewed…

The CDC is lying about e-cigarettes being tobacco products and a gateway to youth smoking, states Michael Siegel, a professor at the Boston University School of Public Health.

Anecdotes abound that Shuga—a taboo-breaking TV drama confronting HIV—has saved lives. However, it’s difficult to evaluate just how effective this show is at changing risky sexual behaviors.

Journalism can be a powerful—and even lifesaving—tool to shine a spotlight on politically and economically driven health inequities and spark advocacy toward change. Writing in SciDevNet, Anita Makri cites several documentaries, recently screened at the Global Health Film…