Migrants and refugees are suffering disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic despite playing an outsized role propping up economies and essential services.  

Since the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, the first concern for Lisa Cooper, director of the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute and the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity, was the heightened risk for communities of color—a concern that proved to be true.  

When residents of Grays Ferry—a tight-knit Black community in Philadelphia—started counting, they tallied dozens of loved ones who’d had cancer, many of them unusually young. The common denominator was a 150-year-old refinery looming over their community. In 2016, it was…

Predominantly non-white communities had almost 3X higher COVID-19 incidence than mostly white communities, even when income levels are accounted for, according to a new JAMA re

Shutting off water services when people can’t pay their bills violates the human right to water—is particularly dangerous in a pandemic, writes Amanda Klasing. In Detroit, Michigan, water shutoffs are correlated with more COVID-19 cases. Some families—particularly Black…

New CDC data reveals an even clearer picture of COVID-19’s disproportionate toll on Black and Latino people in the US. And that is regardless of where they are and how old they are.  

Contact tracing is considered a linchpin in the fight against COVID-19. To work, it requires a level of trust between communities and authorities that doesn’t exist in the face of systemic racism against Black Americans.   Aggressive police crackdowns against anti-racism…

After at least 13 protest participants tested positive for coronavirus, activists in South Carolina are urging demonstrators to get tested before taking to the streets—and some events have been canceled or moved online while organizers evaluate safety measures, The…

Black Medicare patients with COVID-19 are nearly 4X as likely as whites to end up in a hospital, NPR Shots reports, citing federal billing records data released yesterday.

It doesn’t take many patients to trigger a health care crisis in a poor rural community like Lowndes County, Alabama. It has no hospital and 1 doctor. Enter COVID-19 and an infection rate rivaling that of the New York City’s hardest-hit ZIP Code during its peak.    In…