In many countries, sterilization as a mode of birth control has given way to IUDs and the pill. But in India, where it has a troubled past, it remains the top method of birth control.

Most contraception reports focus on surveying women, but to get the full picture of spousal communication on contraception and contraceptive use, it’s crucial to incorporate men to prevent bias.

The rains subsided today, but rescue workers are still at work in Kerala, India, following the area’s worst flooding in nearly a century.  

Heatwaves have created “urban furnaces” that disproportionately affect the poor, separating the world into “the Cool Haves and the Hot Have-Nots,” reports the Guardian in a sweeping series.   Most heatwave research has centered on the West, but a team of Guardian reporters…

Facing a no-confidence motion in parliament, Narendra Modi’s government defended its record on improving the lives of women, citing harsher rape sentences and a clean cooking initiative. Yet the administration has not addressed low political participation among women,…

South Indian women diagnosed with cancer fear more than death—they worry about their reputation.   Shame, amplified for cancers involving the reproductive system, can stop them from getting tested and treated, discovered medical anthropologist and Wilson Center Public…

Under a more conservative Supreme Court, the future of Roe v. Wade is unclear at best. But abortions are already illegal or difficult to obtain in some states, forcing women to travel, delay the procedure, or try a more modern option: mail-order abortions.

Extreme heat threatens the lives and livelihoods of millions worldwide. A recent World Bank report notes that increasing temperatures will reduce 800 million people’s living standards.   India’s large cities are at special risk; 24 of the 100 largest cities with summer high…

India’s Bellandur Lake in Bengaluru is prone to bursting into flames, while a detergent-like foam sometimes tops the Yamuna river flowing through New Delhi.  

Swedish journalist Anna Dahlqvist’s latest book was driven by anger: Women are seen "seen as miracle makers" for having children, she says, yet periods are "something we’re told we should be ashamed of or hide."