It doesn’t take many patients to trigger a health care crisis in a poor rural community like Lowndes County, Alabama. It has no hospital and 1 doctor. Enter COVID-19 and an infection rate rivaling that of the New York City’s hardest-hit ZIP Code during its peak.    In…

The white upper classes initially brought COVID-19 to Brazil, but now poorer black and mixed-race communities are being particularly hard-hit.   As in the US, research has shown that COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians than for whites, driven by stark health…

It’s well-known that a child’s socioeconomic background plays a leading role in dictating their life’s course—much of that insight comes from a seminal study following 790 Baltimore first-graders until they turned 28.   When the Beginning School study began in 1982, “the…

Black people accounted for 77% of coronavirus hospitalizations in a new study of Louisiana’s largest health system—yet just 31% of the typical patient population, NOLA.com reports.

While headlines highlight COVID-19’s disproportionate toll on black communities, few discuss the potential added dangers to black doctors and nurses who work in underserved minority communities. They are serving patients who often “can’t afford primary care physicians, use…

Some rural communities have taken cold comfort in the notion that their isolation may shield them from the worst of COVID-19. But that's not always the case—and in tight-knit communities, the deaths hit close to home for everyone.

Men, ethnic minorities, older people, those with uncontrolled diabetes and severe asthma, and people from disadvantaged backgrounds were confirmed to be at increased risk of death from COVID-19 in a large, not-yet-peer reviewed study, according to 

With no assurance that COVID-19 will fade with warmer weather, US cities prone to deadly heat waves are grappling with the notion of a summer without public pools, recreation centers, and cooling areas that can literally be lifesavers, <

COVID-19 is disproportionately infecting and killing African Americans—but that information is emerging from places like Milwaukee, Wisconsin and not the CDC.   Available data offer a stark snapshot of what the national breakdown might look like. The CDC hasn't released…

Ample research cites unequal distribution of child mortality according to wealth, geography, and education. Yet few studies address ethnicity, write Joanna R.M. Armstrong Schellenberg and Della Berhanu of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.