The world let down its guard on typhoid, and now untreatable strains threaten to cause a major global health emergency, Oxford Martin School researchers warn in a supplement on typhoid in Clinical Infectious Diseases.  

Gaming advocates in South Korea want the WHO to drop “Internet gaming disorder” from its list of classified diseases, even as the government considers adding it to their own disease roster.   Industry advocates say that would undercut South Korea’s economy. In 2017…

In 2014, a strange new illness emerged in the US. Kids woke up healthy but could be paralyzed by nightfall. While some were permanently disabled, others—even in the same family—barely got a fever. Acute flaccid myelitis, like polio decades before, seemed to strike at random…

Anemia can be deadly—especially for women of childbearing age in low-resource regions—but a new study shows it can be greatly reduced in as few as 10 months.  

Farming is the major source of income for young adults residing in sub-Saharan Africa. But for those living in the mycetoma belt, it’s also a curse—one that will continue to destroy lives until affected countries step up and prioritize mycetoma surveillance, management and…

The rare, polio-like illness acute flaccid myelitis spike in the US has peaked, but the quest to understand the disease continues. Cases surged in 2014, then in 2016, and again in 2018, with 158 cases confirmed so far. This year, parents and the medical community are more…

Scientists believe the STD mycoplasma genitalium—Mgen—infects 1-3% of the population. However, it often doesn’t cause symptoms or is easily confused with better-known conditions. That’s a big problem because Mgen may be linked to pelvic inflammatory disease—another…

Venezuela’s social and economic collapse has reached well beyond its borders. Migrants take once-eliminated diseases with them, exposing holes in other countries’ public health programs. Once a pioneer against malaria, Venezuela has seen its cases triple in 3 years. And…

Mycetoma patients—who suffer masses under the skin caused by an array of fungi and bacteria—often lack access to efficient care; but researchers exploring the disease in Sudan have found potential in community-based treatment.

Not enough is being done to test for and treat HTLV-1, warn doctors alarmed by infection rates among adults exceeding 40% in some remote parts of central Australia.