In low- and middle-income countries with similar socioeconomic characteristics, the toll of burns varies—but they all share a shortage of treatment options.

Emaline Laney is the reason that Global Health NOW sent journalist Joanne Silberner to Nepal to cover the devastating problem of burns, culminating in the 3-part "Blazing Injustice" series.

Cesarean section is a crucial, life-saving alternative to natural childbirth—but too often it is becoming the default choice, write Laxmi Tamang and colleagues. In Nepal it is “alarmingly escalating.”

In Nepal, an estimated 56,000 people are burned seriously each year—yet only about 1,000 receive proper treatment. Through the lens of Rojita Adhikari, the photographer who accompanied journalist Joanne Silberner to cover burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of…

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – What’s the best treatment for burns? Prevention. That’s the answer you’ll get from most health care providers in rich and poor countries alike. But in poor countries, there’s little or no funding for burn prevention research and not much scientific…

In Part II of GHN's Exclusive 3-part special series on burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of 2017—Joanne Silberner puts the extent of untreated burns in Nepal into focus: Of an estimated 56,000 burn injuries in the country in 2008, only about 1,000 received …

Intro to the Series Burns cause an estimated 180,000 deaths each year, yet they rarely rate a significant spot on the global health agenda.

In Part I of GHN's Exclusive 3-part special series on burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of 2017—Joanne Silberner profiles the efforts of surgeon Shankar Man Rai to help forgotten patients in Nepal.

In Kathmandu, Nepal, thousands of back-up diesel generators spew noxious particulate matter, or PM2.5, into the air every time a blackout occurs—which is often in a city that cannot meet demand for electricity. As a result, doctors are constantly treating patients for…

We have the winners: Unintentional burns in Nepal, submitted by Emaline Laney, and deafness in developing countries, proposed by Christi Batamula and by Matthew Yau, are the Untold Global Health Stories of 2017.