HIV prevalence in Nigeria is about 4%. But among gay men and MSM this figure is more like 30% with untold numbers of men—and the women they marry to avoid suspicion—unaware of their status.   Stigma means that many will not seek health services, while a lack of training for…

A traditional post-natal practice in parts of Nigeria—pressing a napkin heated on a lantern on the umbilical cord until it falls off—is one reason Nigeria still struggles with preventable neonatal tetanus.   The problem is that sometimes the lanterns are rusted, and the…

Our work is based on science and trust, on our ability to communicate reliable information—and on having people believe that information is real. We help Tanzanians change their behaviors to protect themselves from malaria by laying out the advantages of sleeping under…

Neglected tropical diseases like waterborne Bilharzia, or Schistosomiasis, prey on Nigeria’s poor, rural communities—but the country’s ability to fight disease should not be underestimated, writes Mark Doyle.

Attacks on health care killed nearly 400 patients and health workers in 2017 across 23 countries—and that’s likely a vast underestimate, found the latest report by the Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition.

210,000 barrels of crude oil are produced each day in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The lead-laced soot spewing from those plants, plus pollution from petrochemical plants and asphalt factories, have seen residents endure oil spills, acid rain, gas flares and hospitals…

Meeting the unmet need for contraception could reap huge economic rewards by 2030, according to an analysis of the potential benefits of reaching the FP2020 and SDG family planning targets. India could save $89.7 billion. Nigeria, $12.9 billion.

Since January Nigeria has seen over 1000 suspected cases of Lassa fever and about 90 deaths. Researchers are scrambling to understand this year's unusually high toll.Hard-to-diagnose Lassa often causes only mild symptoms, but is deadly. And like many diseases that present…

More than 1 billion pounds of garbage pile up each year globally.In fast-growing African cities, improper garbage disposal spurs epidemics of malaria, yellow fever, and 2 recent outbreaks of Lassa fever in Lagos—now Africa’s largest city at 21 million people.

In 113 developing countries, agriculture is 3/4 less productive than other sectors. One reason: neglecting the health of workers, especially in humid areas favored by disease vectors, concludes new research led by Andrew Dillon at Michigan State University.