Experts who want to move the needle on noncommunicable diseases have a few challenges. First among these is explaining the awkward umbrella term for a slew of diseases ranging from cancer and cardiovascular disease to diabetes and Alzheimer’s.   To provide some outside-the…

Before Hannah McNeish began her research on hemophilia care in Kenya, she expected to write a medical story. Factor concentrates—the medications used to treat the blood disorder—were an important part of the story, but she found much more. 

MURANGA, KENYA – Jane Mugasha only learned about hemophilia 8 years ago after nearly losing a patient who had come to her hospital for a routine circumcision. “When we tried to dress the wound, the boy would keep on bleeding and bleeding and we did not know what to do,”…

NAIROBI, KENYA – After months of traversing Kenya on buses to get a bruised and constantly bleeding baby to the country’s best hospitals, and after lost tests, delayed results, and wrong diagnoses, Maureen Miruka finally learned in 2001 that her son had hemophilia.

Intro to the Series An estimated 1 in 10,000 people are born with hemophilia, a blood disorder caused by a lack of proteins needed to stop bleeding. While those in developed countries have access to treatment that allows them to lead normal lives, that is not the case for…

To the government leaders gathered in New York today for the third UN high-level meeting on noncommunicable diseases, Michael R. Bloomberg brings a positive message: The 41 million annual deaths from NCDs are largely preventable. What’s needed to save millions of lives is…

Tens of thousands of women with the most common form of breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy post-surgery, according to much-anticipated research published Sunday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Disorganized data is holding back research into genetic data that can help predict which drugs will work on tumors.

GENEVA – One reason that interventions for noncommunicable diseases don’t garner sufficient global attention and funding is that counting deaths alone isn’t persuasive. 40 million NCD deaths each year is a massive tragedy, but repeatedly citing mortality data doesn’t seem…

Fresh WHO data shows that 9 in 10 people breathe air laced with high levels of pollutants, and a shocking 7 million people die annually because of it—the vast majority in low and middle-income countries.