People are living longer but with more disabilities, according to the latest numbers published today in 

The average person spends less than 10 seconds reading food labels when they are shopping for groceries, and that is not lost on the food industry.  

A Mexican community of just 5,000 people has the highest rate of kidney disease in the world—and young people bear the brunt, not their parents and grandparents.   The scourge in San Pedro Itzicán has been linked to rising contamination around Laka Chapala—a key water…

Office air is laden with ozone, carbon dioxide, particulate matter and volatile organic compounds, according to Purdue University researchers. And they may be affecting performance—VOCs have been linked to fatigue and concentration problems—not to mention cancer. Most…

Most European countries aren’t doing enough to address—and measure—the health of prisoners, the WHO concludes in a new report.  

DAKAR—Senegal’s bustling capital—one of West Africa’s biggest cities, with nearly 2.5 million people—is surprisingly calm and quiet in the early hours of the morning.

Experts who want to move the needle on noncommunicable diseases have a few challenges. First among these is explaining the awkward umbrella term for a slew of diseases ranging from cancer and cardiovascular disease to diabetes and Alzheimer’s.   To provide some outside-the…

Before Hannah McNeish began her research on hemophilia care in Kenya, she expected to write a medical story. Factor concentrates—the medications used to treat the blood disorder—were an important part of the story, but she found much more. 

MURANGA, KENYA – Jane Mugasha only learned about hemophilia 8 years ago after nearly losing a patient who had come to her hospital for a routine circumcision. “When we tried to dress the wound, the boy would keep on bleeding and bleeding and we did not know what to do,”…

NAIROBI, KENYA – After months of traversing Kenya on buses to get a bruised and constantly bleeding baby to the country’s best hospitals, and after lost tests, delayed results, and wrong diagnoses, Maureen Miruka finally learned in 2001 that her son had hemophilia.