The rise of IUDs in America has led some to suggest that the devices can help quell poverty. Wider access to IUDs is seen as a positive, but this argument walks dangerously close to America’s shameful history of reproductive coercion, write Christine Dehlendorf and Kelsey…

Ethiopia’s African Child Policy Forum just released its latest report ranking countries on a “Child-Friendliness Index” with a call to action.     The rankings, released periodically since 2008, look at efforts around children’s health like poverty rates, nutrition and…

Despite passage of the Clean Air Act 1956, London remains the “tuberculosis capital of Europe.” Author Francis Wilson traces TB’s indomitable evolution from the largely romanticized “‘disease of storytellers" consumed by a flame inside the body to modern outbreaks whose…

Nearly 11 million children will likely die from pneumonia by 2030, according to a new analysis released yesterday on World Pneumonia Day. Children living in poverty are most at risk with more than 1.7 million children predicted to die in both India and Nigeria over the next…

There are exciting reasons to be hopeful about the promise of vaccines—such as those using mRNA, which could be developed faster and cheaper.   Many of the quantum leaps in vaccine research, write Christopher J. Elias and Trevor Mundel, of the Bill & Melinda Gates…

The world’s population is growing the fastest in the world’s poorest countries, threatening decades of progress fighting poverty and disease, according to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeeper’s report that is coming out today.  

Does poverty affect early childhood development? An unprecedented study launching next month investigates the developmental effects on children of low-income mothers who receive an unconditional monthly payment of $333 for their child’s first 3 years.

From drivers straining to see the road to children who can’t see their textbooks, those in dire need for eyeglasses have taken a backseat to more complex global health priorities, like infectious diseases. 

There is a saying that neglected diseases “begin where the road ends.” These diseases of poverty strike the most marginalized populations and strain to attract the resources, funding, and attention of a world that is saturated by increasingly convoluted problems.

Just in time for the World Economic Forum, new numbers from Oxfam highlight the ever-widening chasm between rich and poor, calling for mo