War-weary South Sudanese women trying to reach Uganda’s refugee camps often faced a second wave of attacks along the way—sexual violence. Rape has been a defining part of the civil war that has collapsed South Sudan, writes Pulitzer Center fellow Amanda Sperber, driving…

200,000 Rohingya gathered peacefully yesterday to mark “Genocide Day,” 2 years after a brutal military crackdown in Myanmar (Burma) drove 740,000 Rohingya into Bangladesh, Al Jazeera reports.   So far, repatriation offers have received no takers. At the rally, Rohingya…

Poor conditions at US border facilities increase the risk of spreading infectious diseases like the flu, physicians warned this morning in a letter urging Congress to investigate the deaths of 6 children in US custody. Noting that flu played a role in at least 3 deaths,…

Heavy rainfall threatens thousands of Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh with flooding and landslides, UNICEF reported yesterday.  

Rise with Refugees: Responding to an Urgent and Accelerating Global Crisis In collaboration with Global Health NOW from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Stanford Refugee Research Project is convening UN leaders and other experts to explore how to…

The idyllic Micronesian island of Kiribati, next door to French Polynesia (Tahiti) and boasting one of the largest marine sanctuaries in the world, is a tropical paradise. It’s hard to believe that its people are expected to become some of the world’s first climate change…

The Trump administration plans to stop funding a UN program that supports Palestinian refugees and call for up to a 90% reduction in the number of Palestinians classified as refugees. The Washington Post reports the administration will announce the changes in several weeks…

Indigenous peoples leave the smallest carbon footprint, yet they disproportionately face the consequences of climate change—including forced migration.  

Jacob Atem was among 30,000 “lost boys” left behind after government militias decimated their villages in now-independent South Sudan. The US took in some 3,800, including Atem in 2001, offering an invaluable—and increasingly scarce—opportunity.

Algeria has expelled some 13,000 migrants in the past 14 months, leaving them stranded in the Sahara desert without food or water. Scores have perished as a growing number of sub-Saharan migrants—pregnant women and children among them—are rounded up "dropped in the desert…