Death just got a lot more complicated. 4 hours after being slaughtered, Yale School of Medicine scientists revived pigs’ disembodied brains. The process mimicked blood flow by pumping the brains with nutrients and oxygen. The technique brought back some key functions like…

Nearly half of Africa’s population remains at risk of infection by parasites such as intestinal worms—yet deworming treatments are “mind-blowingly inexpensive and easy to treat,” The END Fund says.  

With cholera outbreaks in Yemen and Mozambique, researchers looked to a WWI-era strain for clues to understanding spread. Scientists mapped the genome from the oldest known sample of the V. cholerae bacterium, taken from a soldier in 1916. Analysis revealed a non-…

Contraceptives may soon get flashier—and more discreet.

What if the answer to cancer was to manage it, rather than try to cure it? After all, a similar approach succeeded in keeping diamondback moths at bay, reasoned Richard Gatenby. The radiologist and Darwin enthusiast had heard of the critters destroying crops, and coming…

From handwashing in Kenya to Ebola in Nigeria, the vogue human-centered design—including co-designing with communities, interviews, speedy prototyping—has swept global health with qualitative information. But to properly serve the customers of the industry—the 800 million…

The BMJ’s roundup of neglected disease innovations in South Asia shows successes towards the SDG of ending these epidemics by 2030. It also surfaces significant gaps in prevention and treatment, writes Suman Rijal of Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative of India in an…

George Washington School of Medicine researchers have successfully used CRISPR/Cas9 in animal models to reduce harm caused by the parasites behind schistosomiasis and liver fluke infections. The worms, which enter the body by burrowing into the skin (schistosomiasis) or via…

Could a $350 worm-powered toilet that doesn’t flush be the future of sanitation? The Tiger Toilet resembles a standard pit latrine. But it doesn’t stink, thanks to a built-in colony of tiger worms deployed to feast on feces. When the worms have done their work, a much…

Traditional Chinese medicine has been around for over 2,500 years—and now for the first time, its diagnoses will be included in the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases. The influential document guides global health statistics and insurance reimbursement decisions.