More than 1 billion pounds of garbage pile up each year globally.In fast-growing African cities, improper garbage disposal spurs epidemics of malaria, yellow fever, and 2 recent outbreaks of Lassa fever in Lagos—now Africa’s largest city at 21 million people.

There are ways to put waste to work. That’s essentially the premise of sanitation engineer Ashley Muspratt’s sanitation and renewable-fuel company, Pivot, which repurposes human waste in Rwanda. And she’s not alone in her thinking. More and more entrepreneurs are attempting…

The food Americans waste each year could feed 84% of the US population, according to a new article in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.   

As the unsustainable convenience culture of the West has caused food-packaging waste to litter beaches and pack landfills worldwide, The Guardian’s Dave Hall asked readers how they reduce waste.   Reader suggestions include buying unpackaged food, going to farmers markets…

Perfectly good equipment cast aside for upgraded models, still-safe supplies that slip past their expiration date, items tossed for infection control regulations—it adds up to a staggering amount of waste in the US.   

Africa has long been a dumping ground for rich nations’ discarded electronics, write the editors of Africa Times. But new research suggests domestic consumption is a growing contributor to the continent’s e-waste problem.     Innovative electronic recycling could be a…

Once one of the world’s biggest electronics graveyards, Guiyu, China, has cleaned up since the local government’s relocation of all e-waste to an industrial park in late 2015. But looks are deceiving. Today, migrant workers inside the park use their bare hands to tear…

Public defecation has huge public health and social consequences. In India alone, over 600 million people defecate outside, which leads to upticks in diarrheal disease and leaves girls and women vulnerable to sexual assault.   Global health officials have instituted a…

More than 1/2 the world’s 7.4 billion people live in urban areas. And 800 million of those urban dwellers don’t have access to an adequate sanitation system, including safe, private toilets. Such circumstances encourage outbreaks of diseases, including cholera.

Challenges facing our global food system—like climate change, antibiotic resistance and environmental health—require creative solutions beyond traditional research and policy advocacy. That’s the message of Anthony D. So, the new director of the Center for a Livable Future…