Manufacturing antibiotics is tricky: They’re as pricey to make as any other drug but, unlike meds for cancer or chronic illnesses, they’re curative. That means limited doses are required for success. Their profitability is also curbed by antibiotic resistance that forces…

Mycobacterium tuberculosis’s ability to develop resistance to antibiotics has long been a threat to global health. Matthew Wipperman, PhD, MSc, a research scientist in the Immunology Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and colleagues recently published a…

New bacteria strains with greater tolerance to alcohol-based hand sanitizers could spell trouble for hospitals.  

To combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, we need a new slate of drugs. Several entities are committed to fostering the research into antimicrobial resistance. With so many cooks in the kitchen, the WHO has a leading role to play in coordinating R&D…

Of the ~200 countries that pledged in 2015 to address the sweeping overuse of antibiotics, only about half have developed national action plans, Reuters reported.  

The ads take clear aim at stressed, hassled moms. “Breathe,” one ad encourages moms. “Pour a glass of wine … Prepare your family the chicken. Whether the label says ‘no antibiotics’ or not, the meat and milk you buy is free of harmful residues from antibiotics.”

The US Department of State named University of Minnesota's Michael Osterholm one of 5 US science envoys this week. The epidemiologist said he’ll focus on antibiotic resistance and stewardship—especially in low-resource countries. And he isn’t hung up on the politics. "This…

Excessive, unnecessary use of medically important antibiotics in livestock production is spurring antibiotic resistance in animals and humans, confirms a Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) report published this week.

Researchers may have a new foothold in their advances against antibiotic-resistant infections: fat.

The WHO says it will decide by 2019 whether to recommend routine antibiotics for infants in poor countries after a large study—known as the Mordor trial—revealed that receiving 2 annual doses of antibiotics reduced infant mortality by as much as 25%.