India is one of the world’s largest consumers of antibiotics, but it is ill prepared for the threat of antimicrobial resistance, according to a new analysis published in the BMJ.   The authors examined PubMed studies, reports and policy documents on AMR, and patent…

Nowhere may the threat of antimicrobial resistance be higher than in the WHO-defined South East Asia region, which includes countries such as Bangladesh, Bhutan and India. Indeed, aggravated by such factors as lack of sanitation and hygiene, ease of access to antibiotics…

Researchers successfully applied bacteriophage therapy—which uses harmless phages, viruses that replicate within bacteria—to help a 68-year-old diabetic patient with necrotizing pancreatitis and a multidrug-resistant infection return to health.   Bacteriophage therapy holds…

On top of the threat to human health inherent in pumping chickens with antibiotics, the economics don’t add up, either.  

Today and tomorrow, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing will host #AMRchat, a Twitter chat to discuss how to combat antimicrobial resistance and communicate information to patients and the public. 9 am today to 5 pm Friday #AMRchat

Genes resistant to last-resort antibiotic colistin may already exist naturally, say researchers in a new article in mBio. That means bacteria can develop resistance to the antibiotic without being exposed to it.

By tackling factory farming, the WHO could fight all 3 of the “slow-motion disasters” outlined by outgoing WHO Director-General Margaret Chan, MD at last year’s World Health Assembly (WHA): climate change, antibiotic resistance and noncommunicable diseases threatening…

We need to standardize the terminology we use to talk about antibiotic resistance, argues an international group of researchers led by University of Cape Town’s Marc Mendelson. Because dealing with this global problem requires participation from governments, health experts…

Despite lip service from politicians, antimicrobial resistance has remained a backburner issue, argue Laurie Garrett of the Council on Foreign Relations and Ramanan Laxminarayan of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy.  

The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria “is a classic example of the tragedy of the commons, where individuals rationally pursuing their own interests ultimately create a collective disaster,” argues BBC columnist Tim Harford. Though we’ve long known overuse could breed…