As a medical student in Rwanda, Jean Christophe Rusatira grew determined to help the many street kids he encountered near his university. Rusatira’s quest to help youth find better opportunities sparked his career-shaping interest in public health, and ultimately led to his…

Patricee Douglas, MBBS, a 120 Under 40: The New Generation of Family Planning Leaders winner of 2016, stands out as the only winner from the Caribbean region. The program, organized by the Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the…

67% of US pregnancies flagged with a chromosomal abnormality are terminated. In Iceland, that number is almost 100%.With the rise of screening for genetic disorders, the island nation has nearly eradicated Down syndrome births. 80-85% of pregnant women identified as “high-…

The scores are in, and not one country is living up to the recommended standards for breastfeeding.   UNICEF, WHO and the Global Breastfeeding Collective released the Global Breastfeeding Scorecard and called out countries for failing to invest in breastfeeding.   The…

An emerging model of care for opioid-dependent newborns places mothers and infants together in low-stimulation environments to try to avert morphine treatment for newborns.Under this model, mothers are trained to be the first line of care from birth. Together with hospital…

Melinda Gates called on leaders yesterday to prioritize family planning on the global agenda, saying contraceptives are “one of the greatest anti-poverty innovations the world has ever known.”Access to birth control improves child health and education prospects because…

Poverty, violence and climate change in West and Central Africa have displaced more than 7 million children, according to a new Unicef report.

Why do many US mothers struggle with breastfeeding? UCLA evolutionary anthropologist Brooke Scelza found a possible answer among Namibia’s Himba ethnic group.Through interviews with about 30 Himba moms, she uncovered a key practice that helps them succeed at breastfeeding:…

Pew distinguished fellow Alfred Sommer linked vitamin A deficiencies with child mortality in the 1970s, a discovery the World Bank has called “one of the most cost-effective health treatments in history.”

In conflicts and disasters, homes and schools are destroyed, livelihoods are lost, and protections evaporate—placing children at especially high risk of child labor.