The waters of South Asia’s devastating floods are receding, but the nightmare isn’t over for the thousands in Nepal and Bangladesh suffering from outbreaks of diarrhea, malaria and dengue.In the aftermath of the region’s worst floods in a decade, about 13,000 people in…

I noted with interest a Tweet in GHN last week linking to a STAT article labeling the risk of tetanus following Houston’s flooding an “old wives’ tale.” Helen Branswell quoted experts—even the CDC—as sa

It’s been a horrible few weeks. Flooding has displaced millions in South Asia. Mudslides killed more than 500 people in Sierra Leone. Hurricane Harvey delivered a 1,000-year flood.  

Even when flood waters recede from Houston and recovery efforts begin, another catastrophe will slowly unfold: Health issues from mold.

Armed with heartbreaking images, Nicholas Kristof doesn’t mince words. “Let’s be blunt: With U.S. and U.K. complicity, the Saudi government is committing war crimes in Yemen,” he writes.

In the wake of flooding and mudslides this month that left at least 300 dead and more than 1,000 homeless in Sierra Leone, columnist Elkass Sannoh sees one clear culprit: a “blind and deaf government.”Neglect of technology and lack of funding for the Meteorological…

The most chilling refrain from Hurricane Harvey survivors: “the water is rising.”  

On 2 continents, catastrophic flooding has led to unprecedented destruction and a death toll that promises to rise.

About 40 million people in Bangladesh—1/4 of the population—are exposed to drinking water containing arsenic, leading to as many as 43,000 deaths each year.   But this public health crisis, considered one of the world’s largest, is little known outside of scientific circles…

Sierra Leone’s devastating mudslides, which killed about 400 people and rendered more than 3,000 homeless, raise critical questions about the underlying causes. To identify lessons that could avert future disasters, the Thomson Reuters Foundation turned to aid organizations…