From our World Health Assembly coverage to our Untold Global Health Stories of 2016 series on Konzo, it's been a busy year for GHN exclusives. Here's a sampling of our top 10, featuring some of our most intriguing commentaries and interviews. Bitter Harvest:…

We recognized some of the phenomenal reporting we found over 2016, and the expert journalists behind the stories. In case you missed them the first time, here's a second chance to catch some great reads. HUMAN RIGHTS Death in Manila It’s…

Health and Humanity: A History of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 1935-1985 by Karen Kruse Thomas chronicles the development of public health at Johns Hopkins, set in the context of mid-20th century public health education, research and policy…

In the fight to eliminate AIDS in children by 2020, Charles Lyons, president and CEO of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, says continued, targeted global efforts are key. Between 2009 and 2015, the UN-led Global Plan cut new infections in children born to HIV-…

Of the 36.7 million people worldwide living with HIV, 1.8 million are children. While the US and other developing nations have virtually eliminated transmission of the disease from mother to child, middle- and low-income countries around the world have a long way to go to…

Jamaica faces an extraordinary dilemma: How does it prepare HIV-positive youth, originally slated for hospice care, for independent life? The introduction of accessible and affordable antiretroviral medications through the Global Fund and Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative in…

Following an overwhelming majority vote for independence, South Sudan gained its independence from Sudan on July 9, 2011, after years of conflict. 5 years later, the country remains mired in decades-old tribal warfare. Prior to independence, the struggle between northern…

#TropMed16 News Global Health NOW is covering ASTMH every day with news bursts. Check out the news, and if you're in Atlanta, stop by exhibit 411 to say hi and tell us where in the world you'll leave your mark!

It’s easy to become numbed by the global diabetes epidemic.

If you asked them, I suspect most Americans would say that the number of people sleeping in shelters and outside on the streets just keeps multiplying. But recent progress has shown that homelessness is not the intractable problem many people think it is.