Just before WHO Director-General Margaret Chan gave her plenary speech to the World Health Assembly delegates on May 18, the Assembly held a moment of silence and a candle was lit in memory of the many health workers killed in the line of duty.

Unchecked, antimicrobial resistant infections are projected to kill some 10 million people around the world by 2050. And even countries with strong health systems are coming up short in their efforts to combat the problem, according to a recent WHO assessment.

By Michael Murphy and Alan Ricks A rendering of Redemption Pediatric Hospital. Image Courtesy of MASS Design Group.  The aftermath of the world’s worst Ebola outbreak in history provides an important opportunity to reflect on the response; but most importantly,…

A new report by the Center for Public Health and Human Rights and the Syrian American Medical Society recounts the experiences of 27 physicians and other health workers in Syria (all but two of them Syrian) who struggle to provide trauma care and health services to a…

By Ben Tidwell While the prevalence of female genital mutiliation (FGM) in Iraq (8%) means it does not enter the conversation frequently, rates in Iraqi Kurdistan are estimated to be between 60-70%. (Sources here and here.)

There is an elephant in the room. He has been stomping around the world for years, spraying graffiti on mosques, igniting fights and fires. His memory is exceptional, but selective, holding fast to images of war and terrorist attacks.  He even takes lives point blank.

Public health has always been both global and local. Today the need to understand this is more urgent than ever. For example, until very recently, Ebola was addressed as local, thus it was ignored too long as a major global health risk.  Everyone now knows that Ebola can…

Nearly every January since 2003, Alfred Sommer has journeyed to Switzerland to participate in the annual World Economic Forum. This year Sommer, Dean Emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, sent GHN his highlights on health from Davos.

How could Open Access (OA) publishing possibly help fight the Ebola epidemic afflicting some of West Africa’s poorest nations? The Answer: In several ways. OA allows authors to disseminate their research for free around the world whilst maintaining the copyright to…

When Katrina’s floodwaters inundated New Orleans in 2005, the odds seemed stacked against the poor. By hosting its annual meeting here, APHA gave the public health community an opportunity to gauge the recovery process, and think about the preparedness of all of our…