With spring approaching, many students are considering summer global health opportunities. Before you sign up, here are 6 essential things to keep in mind to ensure your experience is safe and ethical. 1. If it looks like your destination has no health care system…

Farming is the major source of income for young adults residing in sub-Saharan Africa. But for those living in the mycetoma belt, it’s also a curse—one that will continue to destroy lives until affected countries step up and prioritize mycetoma surveillance, management and…

The idyllic Micronesian island of Kiribati, next door to French Polynesia (Tahiti) and boasting one of the largest marine sanctuaries in the world, is a tropical paradise. It’s hard to believe that its people are expected to become some of the world’s first climate change…

For Indian airline executive ElsaMarie D’Silva, the gang rape that killed a Delhi college student in 2012 was a turning point.

A few days into 2019, ClimateAdam is in the early stages of Veganuary

Five years ago today, I got up early and pounded out the first issue of what was then called “Global Health eNews.”

Stunning images by Will Swanson, the photographer who accompanied journalist Hannah McNeish on the series, reveal the impact of hemophilia on families and patients in the country—as well as the people working hard to transform their care. Read the whole series…

Before Hannah McNeish began her research on hemophilia care in Kenya, she expected to write a medical story. Factor concentrates—the medications used to treat the blood disorder—were an important part of the story, but she found much more. 

MURANGA, KENYA – Jane Mugasha only learned about hemophilia 8 years ago after nearly losing a patient who had come to her hospital for a routine circumcision. “When we tried to dress the wound, the boy would keep on bleeding and bleeding and we did not know what to do,”…

NAIROBI, KENYA – After months of traversing Kenya on buses to get a bruised and constantly bleeding baby to the country’s best hospitals, and after lost tests, delayed results, and wrong diagnoses, Maureen Miruka finally learned in 2001 that her son had hemophilia.