José Luis Castro has a vision of what Vital Strategies should not be: the Starbucks of global health. The nonprofit will not be building bricks and mortar locations across the globe—though its 407 staff members are intent on improving health in 60 countries…

Technology has already taken disease surveillance a long way since John Snow pored over maps to investigate 19th-Century London’s cholera outbreak. Now, Artificial Intelligence (AI), packing superpowers in data processing and predictive modeling, is poised to be a…

Although malaria deaths have been nearly halved since 2000, the global health community is hardly in a celebratory mood on this World Malaria Day. The reason: Progress against malaria has recently stalled. “We are now at a turning point, warned WHO Director-General Tedros…

Intro to the Series Part I: Palliative Pain Relief Woefully Inadequate Worldwide reveals that in much of the world, unrelieved suffering is a daily reality.

Every year, more than 60 million people worldwide are forced to endure unrelieved pain and suffering—about 2.5 million of them children. They don’t need to. An October 2017 Lancet Commission report on palliative care not only documented the extent of unrelieved suffering,…

As a palliative care doctor in Kerala, India, M.R. Rajagopal, MD, sees suffering every day. Often, that suffering could be alleviated with inexpensive opioid medications, but pain killers are largely unavailable to poor people in India and around the world.

In 2014, a couple named Thampan and Padmini sat in a hospital room in the Kasaragod district of India watching their 9-year-old son as he suffered from agonizing pain in the end-stages of a terminal disease. His 2 siblings had already died, reportedly from the effects of…

Making the case for going big, James Nardella, who serves as a principal at the Skoll Foundation, brought together panelists at the Global Health & Innovation conference to talk about one of the Audacious Project’s big ideas.

Thanks for a Great Conference, Unite for Sight!

The smiling people on the project websites never tell the whole story—global health and development takes hard work, realistic goals, admitting to failure, and sticking around long enough to fix the problems, Jordan Levy told Unite for Sight attendees Saturday.