When Matshidiso Moeti became the first woman to lead WHO’s Regional Office for Africa, the agency was taking heat for its handling of West Africa’s Ebola outbreak—and the tiny public health emergency team was “probably not even eight people.”  

Death just got a lot more complicated. 4 hours after being slaughtered, Yale School of Medicine scientists revived pigs’ disembodied brains. The process mimicked blood flow by pumping the brains with nutrients and oxygen. The technique brought back some key functions like…

Being a twin has its benefits from birth. When both grow up to be astronauts, NASA wins, too. Scott Kelly gathered data on himself for almost a year aboard the International Space Station while his twin brother Mark did the same back on Planet Earth, the New York Times…

A scholar of rights, slavery and freedom, Thea Hunter found herself entrapped in the brutal cycle common to adjunct professors who occupy “the lowest rung” in the caste system of academia, writes Adam Harris. Despite her brilliance, Hunter—a black woman—was unable to…

There’s a saying: “Statistics are human beings with the tears dried off. As somebody who is responsible for building empathy for people forced to flee their homes, I really don’t like statistics,” Melissa Fleming, chief spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees…

Elise Mann knows the roads in rural Malawi—and they are about as inhospitable to aid delivery as possible. With Malawi and neighboring countries in Cyclone Idai’s wake facing a Herculean recovery mission, the rough roads highlight another fundamental global health need, the…

New York City officials declared a public health emergency yesterday and ordered mandatory measles vaccinations over an outbreak centered in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn.   Officials tie Brooklyn’s eruption of cases—at least 285 since September, mostly in…

Mass produced generics have made first-line antibiotics like amoxicillin affordable to the world’s poor. In Kenya, easy access to antibiotics has led to drug resistance that means salmonella kills a third of kids severely sickened by the disease. Well known as a problem…

Yesterday marked a quarter century since the Rwandan genocide that saw nearly 1 million people slaughtered in less than 4 months, The New Humanitarian reports.

Some encouraging news came with words of warning from the WHO: Global life expectancy climbed 5.5 years from 2000-2016, the UN health agency said yesterday. Progress against diseases like malaria contributed to a dramatic drop in under-5 deaths; considerable advances…