A pathbreaker in global health and a former CDC director, Bill Foege has some startling advice for young people interested in global health: Don’t have a life plan. “Life plans are an illusion,” he writes in his new book, “The Fears of the Rich, The Needs of the Poor.”…

Taking its cue from cosmetics giant Avon, the company Living Goods has community health volunteers going door-to-door in rural Kenya and Uganda, offering health advice and low-cost products. Patients text volunteers and receive free home visits; serious cases are referred…

JHSPH’s David Bishai and deputy health officer Henry G. Taylor, son of a principal consultant for the original Declaration, assert that Alma-Ata—“a highlight of 20th-century diplomacy”—was perfectly crafted to address some of today’s biggest health threats like violence,…

Suicide eclipses even armed conflict as the deadliest form of violence across the globe, resulting in around 1 million deaths every year, UN officials noted today, marking World Suicide Prevention Day.

Passengers who fell ill on an Emirates flight from Dubai are thought to have the flu, AP reports.

Complex problems. Competing priorities. Insufficient resources. Conflicting opinions. Political concerns. Just 24 hours in a day... There’s no end to obstacles in public health, but leaders must find a way—or fail. In September 2018, Global Health NOW launches a series (a…

Public health offers better bang for our buck than most other types of health care spending in the US—if we had more of it, what should it be spent on? Austin Frakt and Aaron E. Carroll checked in with officials, academics and funding organizations. The gist:

Worldwide more than a quarter of adults, or 1.4 billion people, aren’t active enough to stay healthy—compared to 23.3% in 2010, according to a new Lancet study documenting a worsening trend of inactivity levels, which has not improved globally since 2001.

When he was the Minister of Health for Ethiopia, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus used to worry instead about the health of 100 million people. Now as WHO’s Director-General, Tedros has 7.5 billion people to worry about.

The unprecedented response to the AIDS epidemic is often viewed as the inaugural moment of the young field of global health. But “it is an error to assign a single disease as its point of origin,” writes Richard Horton—doing so obscures the power dynamics that underlie…