With its health care system already in free-fall, a nationwide blackout in Venezuela has left hospitals—and their patients—in dire straits. Since the outage began Thursday, at least 21 people have died in the country’s public hospitals, Reuters reports.

Rise with Refugees: Responding to an Urgent and Accelerating Global Crisis In collaboration with Global Health NOW from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Stanford Refugee Research Project is convening UN leaders and other experts to explore how to…

On top of the human suffering, internal displacement costs the world almost $13 billion annually, according to a new Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre report.  

The admission by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam—a doctor by training—that he wore blackface during his med school days is just one high-profile example of deeply rooted racism in medicine, explains Duke University’s Damon Tweedy in an interview.

Deployed as fighters, slaves, and informants, the number of children recruited for armed conflict has doubled since 2012, according to a new analysis marking the International Day Against the Use of Child Soldiers.

Today in Cairo, some newborn baby girls will sport blue ribbon pins that look like the Arabic word “no”—showing that their parents are saying no to female genital mutilation, Thomson Reuters Foundation reports.  

19 suspects have been arrested in Uganda for allegedly aiding and abetting female genital mutilation, after local media reported that 400 women were attacked by armed gangs in the past month. Some of the victims are as young as 12, the Guardian reported. 

For Indian airline executive ElsaMarie D’Silva, the gang rape that killed a Delhi college student in 2012 was a turning point.

Thousands more migrant children may have been separated from their families at the US’ southern border than originally believed—though the actual number is still unknown, according to a report released yesterday by Health and Human Services.

Kyrgyzstan outlawed “bride kidnappings”—women abducted and forced to marry—in 2013. The UNDP still estimates some 14% of women under 24 are captured and coerced annually, sometimes by their own female family members who may later shame them into staying in abusive…