GHN is in Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada to bring you news from the 2019 Women Deliver Conferencet

Cyclone Kenneth hit Mozambique just weeks after Cyclone Idai killed over 600 people. The dual strikes have left thousands without adequate health care but the most critical group may be pregnant and new mothers.   An estimated 10,000 pregnant women live in areas where…

In the US, pregnancy-related deaths are up to 3X more likely for African American, Native American and Alaska Native women, according to an alarming new CDC report. Most pregnancy-related deaths are caused by complications from severe bleeding.

Christy Turlington Burns remembers the exact date she became interested in maternal health.

For female migrant workers in the sugar belt of India’s western Maharashtra state, periods are treated as an inconvenient interruption to work. To get rid of them, scores of women cane cutters undergo hysterectomies. Husband-and-wife field teams are fined if they miss a day…

In the US it costs an average of $12,000 to have a baby. In Finland, just named the world's happiest country, parents pay around $60 per night for childbirth services through government-funded health care.  

African refugee women settled in the US may receive less prenatal care, but they still have healthier pregnancies than US-born women. According to a recent University of Buffalo study, acclimatization to US culture—marked by processed food, drug and alcohol use, and…

9 years in the making, a drug trial offers a promising solution to the single biggest cause of maternal death: excessive bleeding. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine researchers found that tranexamic acid—commonly used in surgery—prevented a third of postpartum…

By the time they get their first period, over 50% of Afghan girls have never heard the term zan marizi, “a woman’s illness.” Under shame and secrecy, many avoid bathing for fear of infertility and even more are ostracized due to stigma during menstruation. A new…

Reversing a controversial policy, the Democratic Republic of the Congo will offer an experimental Ebola vaccine to pregnant and lactating women, and infants under 1 year old. The WHO has endorsed the change. Supporters of the exclusion highlighted the lack of data about the…