There is a saying that neglected diseases “begin where the road ends.” These diseases of poverty strike the most marginalized populations and strain to attract the resources, funding, and attention of a world that is saturated by increasingly convoluted problems.

An Oregon woman felt an irritant in her left eye and a week later pulled out a translucent worm; after 2 weeks of treatment, doctors pulled out a couple dozen more. Her case represents the first-ever human instance of Thelazia gulosa, a type of eye worm spread by “face…

Emaline Laney is the reason that Global Health NOW sent journalist Joanne Silberner to Nepal to cover the devastating problem of burns, culminating in the 3-part "Blazing Injustice" series.

US epidemiologists have pinpointed the largest reported cluster—416 cases—of advanced black lung disease, caused by inhalation of coal and silica dust in coal mines, in 3 clinics in central Appalachia.

One reason neglected diseases like mycetoma are so neglected: The lack of market incentives for pharmaceutical companies to develop new drugs.

Tech tools can boost disease-prevention outreach—but reaching remote areas without Internet, cell phone coverage, or ready access to local TV and print media demands a creative approach.

African Heads of State have added 5 top neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) to their annual disease progress report, raising the profile of diseases that put 1.5 billion people at risk globally—including over 620 million in Africa.The number of people at risk of NTDs has…

What makes snakebites—which permanently disable hundreds of thousands and kill 100,000-plus people annually—especially tragic? Highly effective antivenom treatments exist, just not for everyone.People in sub-Saharan Africa, where snakebites kill 20,000 every year, suffer…

Shrinking malaria’s toll is a great health success of our time—but it still kills 430,000 people annually, 70% of them under 5.The RTS,S vaccine is taking a stab at shrinking those numbers—set to be piloted on hundreds of thousands of children in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi in…

Stamping out malaria in the Asia Pacific could not only save 400,000 lives, but $90 billion in health care costs, according to the first major roundup of the economic benefits of being a malaria-free region.