To ensure children with autism spectrum disorder in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas receive appropriate care, Li-Ching Lee traveled to Gaibandha, Bangladesh and adapted standard diagnostic tools to be culturally relevant.   Few people in Gaibandha knew about ASD. “…

By tackling factory farming, the WHO could fight all 3 of the “slow-motion disasters” outlined by outgoing WHO Director-General Margaret Chan, MD at last year’s World Health Assembly (WHA): climate change, antibiotic resistance and noncommunicable diseases threatening…

Delays in education, diagnosis, and treatment all play a role in the current epidemic of w

The gynecology ward’s outdoor waiting room in Gonaives, Haiti, is bright, airy, and clean. More than 70 women have gathered here in this public hospital to learn about the signs and symptoms of women’s cancers and receive screenings for cervical cancer.

Mexico declared diabetes a national health emergency last year, with 13 million adults affected. But the country’s fractured health care system hinders the response to the complex problem, some experts say.   Only about half of Mexicans with diabetes have a diagnosis, and…

When a tumor’s cells become too crowded, it signals them to begin spreading throughout the body, according to groundbreaking research published in Nature Communications.  

“Noncommunicable diseases” is a terrible name. That grab bag of unlike things—diabetes, cancers, Down’s syndrome, cataracts, heart disease—has resisted a compelling, uniting designation, as Oxford’s Luke N. Allen and the OECD’s Andrea B. Feigl pointed out in a February…

Global NGO Pure Earth has spent more than 3 years in Kabwe, Zambia—recently labeled “the world’s most toxic town” by The Guardian in a piece with photos by Pultizer Center grantee Larry C. Price—helping residents to deal with the legacy of environmental damage caused by…

India’s largest ever nationwide diabetes study has revealed much higher prevalence of the disease among poor people that had been shown before, according to a study published Wednesday in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.  

A “pocket-sized” cervical cancer screening device developed by researchers at Duke University could take the place of speculums and costly colposcopes, says a new PLOS One paper. The slender wand can be connected to laptops and cell phones, making self-screening a future…