Feeling foggy or a little slow? Maybe modafinil can help. The drug, typically used to treat sleep disorders, does double duty as a cognitive enhancer, improving decision-making, planning and other complex thinking processes, reports a new study in European…

Africans who depend on drugs produced on the cheap in India could pay the steepest price if proposed changes to Indian patent law are pushed through, warns Maha Rafi Atal, a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.

The FDA approved flibanserin—the world's first drug designed to boost a woman's sexual desire—on August 18; and by October 17, Sprout Pharmaceuticals intends to make the drug available. This timeline chronicles medical and pharmaceutical efforts to deal with the issues of…

You’re sick. You buy some medicine. You don’t get better. For too many people in the world, the reason is counterfeit drugs, which account for an estimated $75 billion of world’s annual $900 billion pharmaceutical sales and about 100,000 deaths per year in Africa alone.

A 79-year-old retired Indian man has been collecting unused prescription drugs from the affluent for the past 8 years, and distributing whatever hasn't expired to India’s needy patients. Omkarnath, known respectfully as “Medicine Baba,” is not a trained pharmacist, and…

WHO recently issued a notice of concern and recommended rejecting a study by contract research organization Quest Life Sciences for poor handling of clinical trial records evaluating different HIV/AIDS drugs.

Efforts to curb the serious malaria problem in Nigeria could become more challenging due to rampant use of sub-standard medicines, suggests a PLOS One study. In 2013, the researchers bought antimalarials in Enugu, a city with about 3.3 million people, from 421 outlets. Of…

Patterson, a historian of African medicine at Wellesley College, explores the important role of pharmacies in Senegal in her book, Pharmacy in Senegal: Gender, Healing, and Entrepreneurship, and she graciously agreed to help us kick off our discussion with a Q&A about…

A program in Tanzania to accredit retail drug shops—where prescriptions were sold illegally and untrained staff provided clinical services—is a model for pulling rural stores into the health system and improving care.

Medicare’s prescription drug program went from spending $0 on popular tranquilizers such as Valium in 2012, to doling out over $377 million for them the next year—a spike that reflects a failed policy initiative by Congress. In the past, lawmakers chose not to cover anti-…