The COVID-19 pandemic underscores the existing vulnerabilities of tribal communities across the US, several of which have been hit by the virus.

It’s looking like China’s severe social distancing policies paid off, as it passed the 5-days with no new locally transmitted cases on March 23.

India put its population of 1.3 billion on lockdown yesterday, heeding calls from the WHO to take aggressive action, UN News reports. “If you can’t handle these 21 days, this country will go back 21 years,” warned Prime Minister Narendra Modi. 

COVID-19 is gaining a foothold in the world’s most overcrowded prison systems, raising grave concern about the spread of the virus in facilities where social distancing can be near impossible.   Venezuela’s notoriously overcrowded prisons are rife with infections—like…

As social distancing expands, the people who are most vulnerable to COVID-19—those over age 60 and those with certain underlying health conditions—are also those most at risk for suffering from loneliness and social isolation. We’ve entered a new period of “social pain,”…

The “threat of a pandemic has become very real,” but COVID-19 is still not a pandemic, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said yesterday, according to Vox. The WHO is avoiding the “P-word” because of:

The global gender gap is shrinking when it comes to education and political influence—and HIV treatment now reaches 13 million women aged 15 years and over,ReliefWeb reports.  

Venezuela’s ongoing economic and humanitarian crisis is increasingly dangerous for the country’s over-65 population. The country has never had strong policies for elder care because it traditionally fell to younger generations. But since 2012, 15% of Venezuelans have fled…

During a historic 2015 outbreak, HIV incidence rates in Austin, Indiana—population 4,000—exceeded those in sub-Saharan Africa.    Why?   Spiraling opioid use—and a slow uptake on needle exchanges that, according to one study, could have slashed Austin’s HIV incidence by 90…

At 49%, Indonesia’s rate of female circumcision is the third highest in the world—despite laws banning the practice.   What keeps it going? In Indonesia, female genital mutilation is rooted as much in family tradition as in religion, according to new research from Gajah…