Public health and anti-tobacco organizations put social media giants on notice to stop giving a platform to Big Tobacco’s hired influencers.  

North Carolina is suing Juul Labs for allegedly deceiving the public about the dangers of nicotine and for aggressively marketing vapes to young people. The state is now the first to take legal action against the vaping giant. The complaint seeks to go further than FDA…

E-cigarettes have single-handedly erased progress against teen tobacco use, according to a damning US CDC report published yesterday. Among American youth, cigarette smoking had been declining since the late 1990s. But from 2017-2018, tobacco use among high schoolers rose…

As debate roils over whether e-cigarettes are a key quit-smoking tool or a bane on health, new research says e-cigarettes are twice as effective as nicotine replacements for people trying to quit, the Washington Post reported<

Teen vaping shot up 75% among high schoolers in 2017. And while e-cig company Juul denies marketing products directly to youths, a new white paper by Stanford University researchers concluded that Juul’s 2015-2018 advertising “was patently youth-oriented.”  

Despite rising health care spending for smoking-related diseases, Indonesia—a major cigarette and tobacco producer—has gone soft on Big Tobacco, anti-smoking advocates charge.  

Little is known about marijuana’s medicinal or injurious effects, which complicates the drug’s shifting legal status. Some studies hint at relief for patients dealing with chronic pain or anxiety. Some indicate higher levels of violence and possible correlative opioid…

When anti-smoking campaigns in the US and Europe dampened cigarette profits, manufacturers set their sights on Asia.   Southeast Asian smokers are set to rise by a million between 2000 and 2025 (to 240 million), according to the WHO—while smokers in the Americas and Europe…

1 in every 9 cigarettes smoked worldwide is illegal—a global scourge that undermines tobacco control efforts while reinforcing the power of organized crime.

The world can learn from Moldova’s tobacco tax, says World Bank’s Patricio V. Marquez. 30% of Moldovan men smoke and the workforce suffered in recent years from premature mortality rates tied to noncommunicable diseases—to which tobacco is a major contributor.