Old-fashioned cigarettes are plummeting in popularity, but ‘Juuling’ has taken their place as the symbol of teen rebellion once embodied by famed smokers like Marilyn Monroe—in the form of discreet, flavored nicotine. Marketed with its own version of “the Virginia Slims…

Vaping is not a reliable path to giving up smoking, according to new research from Georgia State University—adding to a growing body of conflicting research into e-cigarettes’ potential as quit-smoking tools. The researchers found no evidence that electronic nicotine…

E-cigarette and vape companies are exploring new ways to build their reputation as cigarette alternatives.

Between January 1 and today—World No Tobacco Day—tobacco use will have killed nearly 3 million people across the globe. About another 4 million will die before the year’s end. Approximately 1.1 billion people around the world smoke, and 80% of them live in low- and middle-…

From quit-smoking campaigns, to safer cars, to vaccines that stamped out polio and smallpox and are now tackling HPV and the flu, public health interventions are worth the money.

Juul e-cigarettes are all the rage in high schools, college dorms and on social media. Their wild popularity has public health organizations taking the FDA the court for delaying regulations of the “lethal and addictive” substances.

Big Tobacco, beware: A new global watchdog will soon be on your tail. The search is on for a lead organization for Stopping Tobacco Organizations and Products (STOP) that will aggressively track and monitor tobacco industry practices that undermine public health.

The sleek, discreet Juul—the “iPhone of e-cigarettes”—became ubiquitous in schools last fall. Now the FDA is on a mission to crack down on the devices and determine why they’re so popular among youths. The answer could be in marketing materials the FDA has demanded from…

Bloomberg Philanthropies is accepting applications to determine the lead organization(s) for a new global tobacco industry watchdog, Stopping Tobacco Organizations and Products (STOP).

It’s no secret that for decades, Big Tobacco has made trillions of dollars selling a deadly habit by making it seem subversive and cool. While the industry has targeted both men and women, lately tobacco companies have made a concerted effort to attract female customers…