In this long (10,000-plus word) and comprehensive opinion piece about electronic cigarettes, Peter Sandman takes issue with an April 16 CDC news release about the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that summarizes findings from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco…

Hawaii’s governor signed a bill into law on Friday making it the first state to raise the legal smoking age to 21. Also slated to take effect on January 1, 2016: 21 will be the minimum age to buy or use electronic cigarettes. In Hawaii, about 9 of 10 smokers start before…

E-cigarettes have the potential to ignite a public-health revolution, but lawmakers and public-health officials threaten to dash that promise with speculative dangers and spin on facts, argues psychiatrist Sally Satel. Anxieties of “precautionists” like CDC director Thomas…

Beijing’s new ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces is a step in the right direction for China, the most tobacco-addicted country in the world.

The world’s most preventable cause of death—tobacco-related diseases—will claim the lives of more than 8 million people by 2020. 70% of the deaths will occur in developing countries. Here’s a snapshot of India’s staggering tobacco consumption and its consequences:

Public health has an oh-so-serious reputation of sober data analysis and deeply earnest advice. But a new video by Action on Smoking Health called “The Wrinkler” shows it doesn’t always have to be this way. The video employs a rarely used weapon against death and disease:…

Tobacco use is on a pace to kill 1 billion people this century unless governments enact proven measures, such as tobacco taxes, to tackle the world’s leading preventable cause of death, writes Katie Dain, executive director of the Non-Communicable Diseases Alliance.

Some e-cigarettes sold in Japan contain more cancer-causing formaldehyde than normal cigarettes, according to a study funded by the country’s health ministry. The Numbers: 120 micrograms of formaldehyde were found in smoke produced by certain e-cig products compared with…

Getting people to give up nicotine is notoriously tough, but a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers suggests an effective motivator: cash. Not just getting cash for quitting but losing your own money.

The tobacco industry tried to undermine smoking bans in many Muslim countries, attempting to recruit Islamic scholars and reinterpret religious teachings, according to an investigation by Mark Petticrew from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine demonstrated.