Direct-to-consumer genetic testing kits like 23andMe inform buyers of their predisposition to a host of illnesses but they don’t cover assessments, next steps or even psychological support following troubling or confusing results—services traditionally provided by genetic…

Disorganized data is holding back research into genetic data that can help predict which drugs will work on tumors.

Most arbovirus infections, from Zika virus, to West Nile virus, to dengue fever, have no specific treatment or vaccine—with a couple of notable exceptions, such as yellow fever.

Technology has already taken disease surveillance a long way since John Snow pored over maps to investigate 19th-Century London’s cholera outbreak. Now, Artificial Intelligence (AI), packing superpowers in data processing and predictive modeling, is poised to be a…

An extraordinary breakthrough in treating beta thalassemia, published in a landmark New England Journal of Medicine paper, brings hope to the ~300,000 people afflicted with the genetic blood disorder.

The recent wave of genomics research has scientists flocking to Africa to collect data, and African scientists are angling to keep more of that data on home soil, and ensure it benefits Africans. Not many African institutions have the equipment to manage large genomic data…

A public-private partnership in Kenya is providing life-saving oxygen therapy in a part of the world where few health facilities can access it. The WHO estimates less than half of African health facilities have medical-grade oxygen on hand, write Justus Wanzala and Adri…

Global progress against malaria disguises a stark rise in infections and deaths in African countries upended by conflict—but new strategies show promise in the fight, researchers said at a malaria conference in Dakar yesterday.

Making the case for going big, James Nardella, who serves as a principal at the Skoll Foundation, brought together panelists at the Global Health & Innovation conference to talk about one of the Audacious Project’s big ideas.

The smiling people on the project websites never tell the whole story—global health and development takes hard work, realistic goals, admitting to failure, and sticking around long enough to fix the problems, Jordan Levy told Unite for Sight attendees Saturday.