A $2,000 handheld ultrasound device is useful for doctors anywhere. But in poor countries where CT and MRI scanners are scarce, emergency medicine specialist William A. Cherniak has big plans for the Butterfly iQ. The electric shaver-sized device is used mainly to check for…

Pregnancy tracking apps have become wildly popular for helping mothers track their experience—and employers and insurers shell out to get access to that data. Some employers give financial incentives to use the app, then track the anonymized data, helping evaluate employees…

In sub-Saharan Africa, housing classified as “improved” by UN standards—better water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction—doubled from 11% in 2000 to 23% in 2015, per a new study led by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Welcome to the new workplace benefit: constant health surveillance.   Employers and insurance companies are increasingly relying on data from wearable fitness monitors. Fitbit and other devices provide a trove of data on steps, heart rate, sleep length and quality, and…

As the old adage goes: “A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting its shoes on”—and today, rumors take the express train via WhatsApp. India endured violence fueled by rumors long before the age of digital tech. But recently, the ubiquitous…

Facebook’s suicide prevention program may border on unchecked medical research, experts argue. Facebook’s algorithm flags posts that potentially include suicidal threats. A team assesses imminent risk before contacting authorities who can deploy first responders for a “…

Using the make-do “MacGyver” method, emergency physician Thomas Burke designed a lifesaving kit to stop deadly postpartum hemorrhage—which causes 1 in 3 maternal deaths. His low-tech “uterine balloon tamponade” has been deployed thousands of times and boasts a 97% survival…

During the Zika virus outbreak in 2015-2016, scientists eager to study the mysterious virus were hampered by the low abundance of virus particles in any given sick patient. The process was “like fishing for a minnow in an ocean,” writes Leah Eisenstadt.

India’s ubiquitous electricity generators are largely to blame for Delhi’s dangerous levels of particulate matter—which stretch well beyond the WHO’s safety limit. How to stop all that soot from entering the air? Think ink. With its namesake “Chakr Shield,” the startup…

The latest fix for the ultra-hacked lifestyle: Vaev, the tissue that lets you schedule your winter cold. At $80 a box, ultra-chic  tissues claims to enable getting sick “on your own schedule.” The “tissue that carries a human sneeze”—or at least a cocktail of ingredients…