The arrival of the first wave of COVID-19 vaccines brings hope to a battered, weary world that 2021 can be the beginning of the end of a devastating, still-raging pandemic. But while the fight against this terrible disease has showcased an impressive array of global health…

The UK administered the world’s first Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine shots today—a cheaper, easier-to-use alternative to the Pfizer vaccine that Britain rolled out last month,

The SARS-CoV-2 mutation now rapidly spreading across England’s South East is potentially up to 70% more infectious than its predecessor—but not necessarily more dangerous, according to a new 

Our first newsletter of 2020 led with the California wildfires. Our second summary was about a mysterious pneumonia in Wuhan. Within weeks, the virus would define not only the year but a generation. Throughout 2020, courageous and brilliant reporters relentlessly…

Researchers want to make a global disease forecasting system that would be as easy as checking the weather.  

“While there’s no one-size-fits all approach to solving health emergencies, we do know this: accurate, easily available data is key,” says Jonathan Quick, MD, MPH, managing director of he Rockefeller Foundation’s Pandemic Response, Preparedness, and Prevention Initiative.

For tragic reasons, it’s been a banner year for the end-of-life industry, especially innovators like the UK startup Untangle.   The company’s app offers a rare one-stop shop for all things end-of-life, including wills and grief counseling—filling a gap in an industry that’s…

The UK vaulted over the US today in the race to immunize citizens against COVID-19 after it became the first Western country to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine under emergency authorization.

The AstraZeneca/Oxford University COVID-19 vaccine has up to 90% efficacy against SARS-CoV-2—and would be easier to distribute than other promising candidates, according to interim results from a Phase 3 vaccine trial.  

The antiviral remdesivir should not be used as a treatment for hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the WHO now says, citing a lack of evidence that it improves survival or reduces the need for ventilators,