Before the March for Science on Saturday in Washington DC, the scientists and friends got creative. They bought posterboards, brainstormed and came up with some superb signs. (Okay, some printed out the standard signs but they were probably busy discovering something very…

WASHINGTON DC—Sometimes drizzling and sometimes pummeling, H2O couldn’t dampen the spirits of thousands of scientists and supporters who flocked to Washington DC for Saturday’s March for Science—one of 600 such events taking place worldwide.

This April 22, there will be a March for Science in Washington, DC. In fact, there will be 429 marches to support science on that day across the world. This unprecedented movement grew from the momentum of the Women’s March held this past January and the increasing…

San Francisco-based nonprofit Watsi uses crowdfunding to help poor individuals in countries like Haiti get needed medical care. In a Mosaic feature, author Andrew Hankinson traveled to Haiti to explore the ethical tension that comes with individualizing charity and…

Artificial intelligence could one day destroy humanity unless we tame it, according to billionaire space entrepreneur Elon Musk. Taking a deep dive into Musk’s AI concerns, journalist Maureen Dowd relates how he began publicly sounding the alarm in 2014, calling AI “…

BALTIMORE, MD—Kicking off the Light City festival of art, music and innovation this week, Health Lab revealed the outsize role technology is poised to play in health—and the work ahead to expand access.   The day-long speaker series, produced by Baltimore Office of…

An umbilical cord blood transplant saved leukemia patient Chris Lihosit’s life, but the procedure has only been performed around 40,000 times worldwide.  

A new miniature 3-D laboratory model of the human female reproductive tract could encourage new birth control research, help researchers study recurrent miscarriages, and open the door to new fertility treatments. Created by researchers at Northwestern University, the “…

A free app for people with disabilities is making its way in the Caribbean market. Launched by the Caribbean Telecommunications Union, the app will help the visually impaired and those with hearing loss to communicate, do everyday tasks and compete for jobs, advocates say…

3-D printing could bring cheap, easily made prosthetics to low-income countries whose residents have been devastated by conflict or disease. The WHO estimates 30 million people worldwide need prosthetics, braces or other mobility devices, but many poorer countries lack…