The first-ever dengue vaccine had been considered safe in recent years despite concerns that it could worsen the disease in those not previously infected. Then that theory became a reality, and last week the WHO’s expert group, known as the SAGE, recommended reserving…

To get you in the spirit for World Immunization Week, UNICEF bundled up a dozen vaccination facts. In case you want to test yourself first here’s a sampling:

The first-ever dengue vaccine should be reserved “exclusively or almost exclusively” for those previously infected with the disease, the WHO confirmed.

n 2011, journalist Lise Barnéoud and her 2-month-old contracted measles during the Die, France epidemic linked to “anti-vaxxers.” After both survived, Barnéoud (among the hapless patients not fully vaccinated as children) dug into the outbreak’s impacts in her book…

The International Vaccine Access Center helps inform global vaccine policies and implementation but their assessments have to include more than just a measure of efficacy to determine the full benefit of vaccine programs. This includes evaluating things like economic…

Brazil’s yellow fever outbreak, with 1,900+ cases and at least 560 deaths since 2016, caught the country off guard and under-vaccinated—especially in rural areas. Now, officials are trying to play catch-up during a global vaccine shortage so severe that in February, “a gang…

Vaccines are a touchy subject. For some, vaccine mandates symbolize government overreach and prompt anxiety and avoidance, according to Heidi Larson. Add in cultural and religious complexities, and the potential of vaccine programs is limited. Amazing progress has occurred…

Multiple childhood vaccinations do not have the knock-on effects many anti-vaxxers fear.

Since January Nigeria has seen over 1000 suspected cases of Lassa fever and about 90 deaths. Researchers are scrambling to understand this year's unusually high toll.Hard-to-diagnose Lassa often causes only mild symptoms, but is deadly. And like many diseases that present…

Growing access to postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) in Vietnam has seen rabies cases decline 82% from 1994-2016—but some pregnant and breastfeeding women still avoid it, with deadly consequences.