MURANGA, KENYA – Jane Mugasha only learned about hemophilia 8 years ago after nearly losing a patient who had come to her hospital for a routine circumcision. “When we tried to dress the wound, the boy would keep on bleeding and bleeding and we did not know what to do,”…

NAIROBI, KENYA – After months of traversing Kenya on buses to get a bruised and constantly bleeding baby to the country’s best hospitals, and after lost tests, delayed results, and wrong diagnoses, Maureen Miruka finally learned in 2001 that her son had hemophilia.

MURANGA, KENYA — Peter Muchoki spent much of his childhood lonely. He wondered why he was different from the other children. He prayed that he and his brother would be cured of what they called their curse.

Intro to the Series An estimated 1 in 10,000 people are born with hemophilia, a blood disorder caused by a lack of proteins needed to stop bleeding. While those in developed countries have access to treatment that allows them to lead normal lives, that is not the case for…

The Untold Global Health Stories of 2020 Contest Nominations Open - July 31, 2019 Nominations Deadline - September 30, 2019 Judging Complete - October 30, 2019 Winner Notified - November 15, 2019 NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. VOID WHERE…

CUGH, NPR’s Goats and Soda Blog, and Global Health NOW of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Global Health selected two winning entries from over 150 thought-provoking entries. It’s the fourth year of our annual competition, which seeks to identify and give a platform to…

Emaline Laney is the reason that Global Health NOW sent journalist Joanne Silberner to Nepal to cover the devastating problem of burns, culminating in the 3-part "Blazing Injustice" series.

In Nepal, an estimated 56,000 people are burned seriously each year—yet only about 1,000 receive proper treatment. Through the lens of Rojita Adhikari, the photographer who accompanied journalist Joanne Silberner to cover burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of…

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – What’s the best treatment for burns? Prevention. That’s the answer you’ll get from most health care providers in rich and poor countries alike. But in poor countries, there’s little or no funding for burn prevention research and not much scientific…

In Nepal’s burn wards this September, journalist Joanne Silberner saw people recovering from recent burns or surgery. And they were the lucky ones. Perhaps only 1,000 of the 56,000 people with serious burns each year in that country get adequate treatment. The luckiest ones…