5 years after the Rana Plaza disaster that killed over 1,000 employees in one of Bangladesh’s “death trap” garment factories, some progress has been made towards safer working conditions.

The few photos I have seen in newspaper clippings are remarkably similar: Small children with wet faces; their heads cranked back and their lifeless mouths open like dead fish. In one video, a young father tightens his face as he struggles to hold back his tears. The…

Adding to horrific rapes and killings against Rohingya Muslims, Burma’s military has weaponized food—enforcing crippling curfews, closing off access to diet staples like rice, and restricting food aid and trade.

Poor sanitation is linked to child mortality and stunted growth in low-income communities. WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) interventions are implemented to improve child health outcomes but, until recently, their impact had not been evaluated.   A new study found that…

Diphtheria is spreading swiftly among Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, with more than 110 suspected cases and 6 deaths, the WHO reported yesterday.

An increase in child marriage is a startling consequence of climate change. In countries like Bangladesh, where already 52% of girls are married before 18, families anticipating or dealing with financial difficulty from natural disasters like floods, droughts and storms…

A crack team of Stanford researchers is looking to end the scourge of coal and rubber-burning brick kilns in South Asia, where their environmental impacts rival those of cars.   Pollution spewed by the kilns, linked to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, kills tens of…

Midwives are coming to the aid of Rohingya pregnant women and new mothers in local clinics and refugee camps in Bangladesh.   The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) estimates that 16% of Rohingya women refugees ages 15–19 are pregnant or new mothers—many of whom fled to Bangladesh…

About 40 million people in Bangladesh—1/4 of the population—are exposed to drinking water containing arsenic, leading to as many as 43,000 deaths each year.   But this public health crisis, considered one of the world’s largest, is little known outside of scientific circles…

Wealthy women in Bangladesh are driving a C-section boom, which has led to an increase in the rate of the procedure from 4% in 2004 to 23% in 2014. Some put the rate as high as 30% today.