Reversing a controversial policy, the Democratic Republic of the Congo will offer an experimental Ebola vaccine to pregnant and lactating women, and infants under 1 year old. The WHO has endorsed the change. Supporters of the exclusion highlighted the lack of data about the…

The debilitating symptoms of perinatal depression are dangerous to mothers and babies alike. But the condition can be prevented, a national panel has reported for the first time.

Using the make-do “MacGyver” method, emergency physician Thomas Burke designed a lifesaving kit to stop deadly postpartum hemorrhage—which causes 1 in 3 maternal deaths. His low-tech “uterine balloon tamponade” has been deployed thousands of times and boasts a 97% survival…

In 2015, more than 300,000 women died during childbirth—often from preventable causes. 99% of the deaths occurred in developing countries. While maternal mortality fell 44% from 1990-2015, that still falls short of the UN’s goals.

The interests of pregnant women must be addressed in the fight against Lassa fever, urge a trio of bioethicists.  

Anemia is a scourge on pregnant women and children, particularly in the developing world. Iron supplements may be a key intervention, but existing research on their efficacy and safety is patchy. The WHO recommends iron supplements and micronutrient powders for children in…

The high-profile childbirth difficulties of women like Serena Williams—who suffered blood clots after giving birth at 36—have highlighted racial inequities in maternal health long observed by Arline Geronimus of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

For some women in Alabama, using a midwife is less about religion and wellness than avoiding traumatic experiences at hospitals. The state’s infant mortality rate is among America’s highest, and maternal mortality is climbing, too.

Compared to its high-income peers, US women are more likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth and skip out on care because of the cost. A study comparing access to health care and health status among 11 high-income nations—including Australia, Norway and the UK—also found…

It doesn’t take a lot of time or money to improve training of nurses and midwives and make births safer, a Jhpiego-led study determined.   Comparing 3 approaches, the researchers found that short, inexpensive, onsite, simulation-based training led to a 62% decrease in…