Machines that can find volatile organic compounds in human breath—gas-chromatography mass-spectrometers—have been around for awhile. But analyzing them is arduous and error-prone; reams of data on complex compounds must be analyzed by hand. To expedite the process,…

Russia’s HIV/AIDS epidemic is worsening amid paltry government response and ongoing denial: The Ministry of Health’s estimate of about 1 million people living with HIV minimizes expert assessments of closer to 2 million. Numbers aside, even the MoH admits that only a third…

New research may finally make stubborn syphilis a thing of the past. T. pallidum, the bacteria that causes syphilis, is remarkably fragile and a slog to study.

The WHO has deployed response teams in Cameroon after 16 confirmed and suspected cases of monkeypox were reported from 30 April-30 May 2018. The rare zoonosis sporadically appears in Central and West Africa’s forested areas. 

In a security scenario-planning exercise, Sulzhan Bali and a group of colleagues anticipated the economic toll of a Nipah outbreak, spurred by fear and misinformation. That scenario is becoming a reality in Kerala, where the Nipah virus outbreak has now killed 16, false…

Disgust is well known as a tool to protect us from harm, and now researchers have broken the emotion down into 6 categories linked to diseases in humans’ ancestral past. Risky sexual behavior, poor hygiene, rotten food and deformity all made the list, and pus-producing…

In the southern provinces of Mozambique, Rosa Mouzinho is in charge of looking for malaria cases in the region, so that people can receive treatment. Her main tool? A tablet containing the details of malaria cases in her district, Magude. 

Millions of long-lasting insecticide nets are distributed across Africa every year, cutting malaria rates and saving lives. But the manufacturing and supply chains of LLINs are primarily handled by international conglomerates superseding opportunities to create jobs and…

The horror of the AIDS epidemic once united gay politics in America. But the advent of life-saving antiretroviral drugs brought a chasm between ARV haves—white gay men—and have-nots—black gay men who often didn’t get the drugs, writes Steven W. Thrasher.

Egypt, the country with the highest prevalence of hepatitis C, is leading the way in treating the disease with revolutionary new drugs deployed at a scale unmatched by its wealthier counterparts. The secret? Savvy negotiating, and systematic deployment of affordably-priced…