It’s high time science bid farewell to the default male model in animal research, according to the neurologist Rebecca Shansky.   Since 2016 sex has been a required variable in NIH studies, but the bias persists, she writes in a commentary in Science.  

Could researchers tap mobile phone record troves to help save lives? A debate is afoot, and Amy Maxmen exhaustively investigated the pros and cons.   How it works: Anonymized, aggregated records of the origin and timing of texts and calls provide population movement clues…

Women account for over half of people living with HIV worldwide. That’s not obvious from the research, which relies heavily on gay male participants. Yet there are key differences in how male and female immune systems respond to the virus—a relevant factor in efforts to…

Firearm mortality is a leading—and preventable—cause of death in the US, Mexico, Brazil and Colombia. A new study surfaces demographic determinants of death between 1990-2015 and breaks down risk factors by age, sex, education, race or ethnicity (US and Brazil), and intent…

Women in 8 sub-Saharan African countries are using modern contraception at a rate outpacing projections, a new study published in the Lancet Global Health shows.  

“Ears evolved in an acoustic environment that was nothing like the one we live in today”—and the disconnect is causing serious health problems, writes David Owen. For decades, researchers around the globe and under the sea have been dedicated to measuring noise and its wide…

Dentist John Roger Lund’s patients trusted him when he recommended a root canal. Then another, and another. But when Brendon Zeidler took on Lund’s practice, he uncovered the alarming pattern of unnecessary dental work, including a “ludicrously high number of root canals,”…

Resistant to water, oil and heat, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are ubiquitous in everything from clothing to nonstick cookware—and now soil, drinking water and the human body. Yet scientists know precious little about the so-called “forever chemicals” and…

Affectionately known as the “cuddle hormone,” oxytocin is released during sex, childbirth, and breastfeeding and while falling in love. Could it also prevent overeating and help curb the obesity epidemic? Maybe. Harvard Medical School professor Elizabeth Lawson found that a…

Being a twin has its benefits from birth. When both grow up to be astronauts, NASA wins, too. Scott Kelly gathered data on himself for almost a year aboard the International Space Station while his twin brother Mark did the same back on Planet Earth, the New York Times…